A Graduate’s Guide to Making Friends In College
October 12, 2017 (No Comments) by Dean Fitzgerald

The beginning of college is exhilarating and terrifying. In the weeks building up to the start of first year, everyone you meet tells you it will be the best time of your young life. Nodding along and muttering something associated with ‘Can’t wait to start!’, the back of your mind niggles away at you – ‘Is college really for me? What if I don’t like my course? What if I can’t make friends?’

Image result for hiding in fear

This enters almost every prospective student’s mind, so don’t worry too much. In fact, think of it as a positive. Worrying about something is a solid indicator that it holds importance to you. As you frantically think of the best ways of settling down to college life, perhaps you can take a few pointers from a graduate who has lived through it (and is going back for more this year!). Here are a few tips for getting the best out of college.

Join Clubs and Societies that interest you

It’s imperative that you follow up on your hobbies in college. Nearly every college will have dozens of clubs and societies you can choose from. If you are sporty, join a club of a sport you play, or branch into a new sport and see how you do. If you’re more musical, join music and dance societies. If you’re feeling especially eccentric, have a go at a more obscure society.

They cost around €2 to join for the year in most colleges, so join any one you wish, and you’ll begin to meet like-minded people and develop friendships that are a reassurance that college is a great place to be.

Talk to the people on your course

This is most important in the very early weeks, as you look to foster bonds with people you’ll share a lecture hall with for the next 3 or 4 years. Arrive to your lectures a couple of minutes early and talk to classmates outside the lecture hall. Introduce yourself and try to strike up a conversation.

There’s nothing less comfortable than waiting outside a lecture hall in third year with someone you’ve genuinely never talked to, because you know it’s too far gone to try and strike up a friendship at that stage. It’s not too late!

Attend events advertised by the college

Your college most likely has a Student’s Union (SU), which will give you every chance to meet new people through organising events, mostly at night. Take advantage of these golden opportunities and attend as many as possible. You can meet and chat to people on nights out in a situation that is much more casual and fun than during the day.

There’s something oddly comforting about becoming friendly with someone while you’re both in togas. Just let yourself relax and go with the flow.

Go to any pre-drinks you are invited to

There’s nothing like bonding with someone over a game of beer pong, it can’t be explained. It creates a state of comradery that is difficult to match. So if you get invited by a classmate or new roommate to pre-drinks, go for it!

The worst thing that can happen is you don’t have that much fun, and you leave a bit disappointed. However, the rewards far outweigh the risk. Don’t be afraid to dive in and have a bit of craic. Who knows? You might even meet someone special…or at least get a shift.

Find somewhere to stay for the night (Commuters)

Commuters listen up, this one’s just for you. It’s not as good in college when you have to live by a bus schedule, so do your best to figure out a place to stay after a night. Some possibilities include:

  • Asking existing friends
  • Finding people from your school you may be friendly with in the same college
  • Finding college-provided one night accommodation (some colleges provide rooms to rent for one night)
  • Finding family in the college you can stay with

Don’t be afraid to get creative either, within reason. For example, don’t decide to sleep under a bridge for the night just because you can. Not the best way to start college.

For most people, anxiety over starting college will evaporate away over time. If you are struggling, don’t give up. Get stuck into your course and let the college experience come to you. Sometimes wanting to enjoy college life too much makes you overly nervous.

Making the big move to college can throw up lots of problems so learn how to become a little more talented prepping meals right here! Or learn about how to create wholesome breakfasts to keep your stomach from grumbling during a boring double lecture.

Dean Fitzgerald
Can relate any life problems back to GAA. Has an interest in sport of all kinds, including even cricket for some reason.

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A Graduate’s Guide to Making Friends In College
October 12, 2017 (No Comments) by Dean Fitzgerald

The beginning of college is exhilarating and terrifying. In the weeks building up to the start of first year, everyone you meet tells you it will be the best time of your young life. Nodding along and muttering something associated with ‘Can’t wait to start!’, the back of your mind niggles away at you – ‘Is college really for me? What if I don’t like my course? What if I can’t make friends?’

Image result for hiding in fear

This enters almost every prospective student’s mind, so don’t worry too much. In fact, think of it as a positive. Worrying about something is a solid indicator that it holds importance to you. As you frantically think of the best ways of settling down to college life, perhaps you can take a few pointers from a graduate who has lived through it (and is going back for more this year!). Here are a few tips for getting the best out of college.

Join Clubs and Societies that interest you

It’s imperative that you follow up on your hobbies in college. Nearly every college will have dozens of clubs and societies you can choose from. If you are sporty, join a club of a sport you play, or branch into a new sport and see how you do. If you’re more musical, join music and dance societies. If you’re feeling especially eccentric, have a go at a more obscure society.

They cost around €2 to join for the year in most colleges, so join any one you wish, and you’ll begin to meet like-minded people and develop friendships that are a reassurance that college is a great place to be.

Talk to the people on your course

This is most important in the very early weeks, as you look to foster bonds with people you’ll share a lecture hall with for the next 3 or 4 years. Arrive to your lectures a couple of minutes early and talk to classmates outside the lecture hall. Introduce yourself and try to strike up a conversation.

There’s nothing less comfortable than waiting outside a lecture hall in third year with someone you’ve genuinely never talked to, because you know it’s too far gone to try and strike up a friendship at that stage. It’s not too late!

Attend events advertised by the college

Your college most likely has a Student’s Union (SU), which will give you every chance to meet new people through organising events, mostly at night. Take advantage of these golden opportunities and attend as many as possible. You can meet and chat to people on nights out in a situation that is much more casual and fun than during the day.

There’s something oddly comforting about becoming friendly with someone while you’re both in togas. Just let yourself relax and go with the flow.

Go to any pre-drinks you are invited to

There’s nothing like bonding with someone over a game of beer pong, it can’t be explained. It creates a state of comradery that is difficult to match. So if you get invited by a classmate or new roommate to pre-drinks, go for it!

The worst thing that can happen is you don’t have that much fun, and you leave a bit disappointed. However, the rewards far outweigh the risk. Don’t be afraid to dive in and have a bit of craic. Who knows? You might even meet someone special…or at least get a shift.

Find somewhere to stay for the night (Commuters)

Commuters listen up, this one’s just for you. It’s not as good in college when you have to live by a bus schedule, so do your best to figure out a place to stay after a night. Some possibilities include:

  • Asking existing friends
  • Finding people from your school you may be friendly with in the same college
  • Finding college-provided one night accommodation (some colleges provide rooms to rent for one night)
  • Finding family in the college you can stay with

Don’t be afraid to get creative either, within reason. For example, don’t decide to sleep under a bridge for the night just because you can. Not the best way to start college.

For most people, anxiety over starting college will evaporate away over time. If you are struggling, don’t give up. Get stuck into your course and let the college experience come to you. Sometimes wanting to enjoy college life too much makes you overly nervous.

Making the big move to college can throw up lots of problems so learn how to become a little more talented prepping meals right here! Or learn about how to create wholesome breakfasts to keep your stomach from grumbling during a boring double lecture.

Dean Fitzgerald
Can relate any life problems back to GAA. Has an interest in sport of all kinds, including even cricket for some reason.

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