Check Out These Real Life Wonder Women
September 22, 2016 (No Comments) by theSharpeUser

Real Life Wonder Women

What do we think of when we think of a “wonder woman”? Models in a swim-suit? Maybe, and we can perfectly understand why that image or idea would come to mind. But our reality of expectation is changing. We’d think this is for the better. We want to live in a world where women are free to develop themselves, follow their own paths in life and strive to being who they want to become, or at least having the chance to give their dreams a shot. After all, it is not only the man who can have a dream.

To show you this, we’ve compiled a list from around the world of ladies to take note of. Those who aspired for something and worked their asses off to achieve it. An Irish example of this would be columnist and bestselling author, Louise O’Neill. Louise has not only won over the attention and admiration of her readers but more recently has gotten heavily involved in feminist campaigns, particularly a brave one with the “Repeal” project. We would describe this as a movement both socially and politically, with the repeal black and white hoodie a clear symbol of having the confidence to wear your opinions as a means of voicing them.

Sticking with the writers now, NY Times columnist Caroline Paul recently explained in a post on the New York Times website that we are socially constructing girls to play on their “natural” identity as the weaker sex. She speaks about breaking the mould, telling her own story of working in a busy fire department. She challenges the presumption that women should act out their weakness and voice fear in times of danger. Boys can freely live in a dangerous dare devil world but girls must be self-aware and careful, with studies of this parenting approach being seen across the board. Caroline says now, defending those “defenceless” and not letting gender define the way in which we live and act in the world.

In a world where gender and representation of this gender is something ever changing (gender-fluidity having been listed in the Oxford dictionary new this year), Kay Cairns, a 23-year-old Dublin-based freelance journalist, identifies as gender non-binary. This is bravery through self-expression in managing to defy the odds of social norms of who/what you should be and just simply deciding to be yourself instead. An act people should admire from any person, regardless of their sex. Again here Kay shows confidence and bravery, speaking openly and publicly about their decision to be who it is they wish to be.

Next Caroline Caldwell, a photographer and activist holds the belief that advertisements force us to think about ourselves in terms of everything that we’re not. She wanted to go about changing this wrong and she “made a different message, put it up inside of a train, and took a photo”. Her message is one of positivity and hope and we really think we could all take on the challenge of being more positive. Her message outlines that “in a society that profits from your self doubt, liking yourself is a rebellious act”. Why not be a little nicer to ourselves? Simple approach but something utterly life changing.

The Paralympics are taking over screens across the world and it really does make you stop and pay attention. In general women in sport are something to get inspired by, with stats showing that a high percentage of girls drop out of sport around the time of secondary school, we need these inspiring female athletes to spur on future generations. Dedicating so much time to bettering yourself, always trying again when you fall down and finally feeling triumphant in your own skin is something truly amazing. One female athlete that really stood out to me was a blind long jumper from Brazil, competing on her own land, gold medalist Silvania Costa de Oliveira. Overcoming such obstacles with strength, stamina and confidence is everything this woman represents. How could you not be proud of this wonder woman?

We spend a lot of time in the modern world looking for inspiration. Throughout history, it’s fair to say that the majority of those that noted inspiration comes from the male variety. Maybe we don’t need to look to the past. Women are here to be heard so please, remain within earshot for these ladies. We’re sure they won’t let you down, these modern day wonder women. These unsung heroes need to make it to the top of the charts ahead of social media ‘influencers’, reality TV ‘characters’ and fame hunters who’d do anything to see their name in lights.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Find us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

Recent Posts

Check Out These Real Life Wonder Women
September 22, 2016 (No Comments) by theSharpeUser

Real Life Wonder Women

What do we think of when we think of a “wonder woman”? Models in a swim-suit? Maybe, and we can perfectly understand why that image or idea would come to mind. But our reality of expectation is changing. We’d think this is for the better. We want to live in a world where women are free to develop themselves, follow their own paths in life and strive to being who they want to become, or at least having the chance to give their dreams a shot. After all, it is not only the man who can have a dream.

To show you this, we’ve compiled a list from around the world of ladies to take note of. Those who aspired for something and worked their asses off to achieve it. An Irish example of this would be columnist and bestselling author, Louise O’Neill. Louise has not only won over the attention and admiration of her readers but more recently has gotten heavily involved in feminist campaigns, particularly a brave one with the “Repeal” project. We would describe this as a movement both socially and politically, with the repeal black and white hoodie a clear symbol of having the confidence to wear your opinions as a means of voicing them.

Sticking with the writers now, NY Times columnist Caroline Paul recently explained in a post on the New York Times website that we are socially constructing girls to play on their “natural” identity as the weaker sex. She speaks about breaking the mould, telling her own story of working in a busy fire department. She challenges the presumption that women should act out their weakness and voice fear in times of danger. Boys can freely live in a dangerous dare devil world but girls must be self-aware and careful, with studies of this parenting approach being seen across the board. Caroline says now, defending those “defenceless” and not letting gender define the way in which we live and act in the world.

In a world where gender and representation of this gender is something ever changing (gender-fluidity having been listed in the Oxford dictionary new this year), Kay Cairns, a 23-year-old Dublin-based freelance journalist, identifies as gender non-binary. This is bravery through self-expression in managing to defy the odds of social norms of who/what you should be and just simply deciding to be yourself instead. An act people should admire from any person, regardless of their sex. Again here Kay shows confidence and bravery, speaking openly and publicly about their decision to be who it is they wish to be.

Next Caroline Caldwell, a photographer and activist holds the belief that advertisements force us to think about ourselves in terms of everything that we’re not. She wanted to go about changing this wrong and she “made a different message, put it up inside of a train, and took a photo”. Her message is one of positivity and hope and we really think we could all take on the challenge of being more positive. Her message outlines that “in a society that profits from your self doubt, liking yourself is a rebellious act”. Why not be a little nicer to ourselves? Simple approach but something utterly life changing.

The Paralympics are taking over screens across the world and it really does make you stop and pay attention. In general women in sport are something to get inspired by, with stats showing that a high percentage of girls drop out of sport around the time of secondary school, we need these inspiring female athletes to spur on future generations. Dedicating so much time to bettering yourself, always trying again when you fall down and finally feeling triumphant in your own skin is something truly amazing. One female athlete that really stood out to me was a blind long jumper from Brazil, competing on her own land, gold medalist Silvania Costa de Oliveira. Overcoming such obstacles with strength, stamina and confidence is everything this woman represents. How could you not be proud of this wonder woman?

We spend a lot of time in the modern world looking for inspiration. Throughout history, it’s fair to say that the majority of those that noted inspiration comes from the male variety. Maybe we don’t need to look to the past. Women are here to be heard so please, remain within earshot for these ladies. We’re sure they won’t let you down, these modern day wonder women. These unsung heroes need to make it to the top of the charts ahead of social media ‘influencers’, reality TV ‘characters’ and fame hunters who’d do anything to see their name in lights.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Find us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

Recent Posts