What Is Considered Good Social Etiquette in 2016?
September 12, 2016 (No Comments) by theSharpeUser

branded-a-doucheasaurus-post

People are the worst, right? The only thing worse than people is new people but there are some unavoidable situations that call for social interaction. While the times are always changing, there are some timeless rules on how to act around people, here we will look at a few things to consider if you are socially interacting in 2016.

DO: Let them know you will be late – on time
If you are due to meet someone at 1 o’clock, a text at 12.59 to say you won’t be there on time is not necessary – they have that much figured out. As soon as you know that you’ll be late, let your friend/ family member/ date “especially date!”, know what time exactly you will be there. With Facebook, WhatsApp, about a 100 free and openly available instant messaging apps as well as the good old-fashioned phone-call, there is no excuse not to keep whomever you are meeting in the loop as to when you will be joining them.

DON’T: Spend the whole day on the phone
Assuming you weren’t late, once you meet up with your friend have a conversation. You probably arranged to meet up on Facebook so now that your there, TALK to each other. Particularly in a larger group situation – don’t be the guy on the phone the whole time, talk to who is there (even if they are all horrible people, which may often be the case!) and do your best to enjoy the company you are in. Kanye West’s Twitter rant can wait until tomorrow.

DO: Limit the selfies
Come on now, we already mentioned putting the phone away! There should be a rule that limits Snapchats sent to three a day unless you are good at Snapchat (you’re not). A few pictures now and then is okay but don’t interrupt conversations just for a quick snap. There is also a good chance that in a house-party/ night club situation that at least one person in the picture won’t be looking their best – which brings us to…

DON’T: Put up bad pictures of people on Facebook
At this point we are all friends with our aunts on the social network and we don’t want them seeing us at our worst. If you have bad pictures of people when they are drunk by all means keep them and use them for future blackmail (although on second thought that should be filed under DON’T on this list). Either way, nobody needs pictures of them falling over in the club being shared on-line to be seen by that girl they kind of liked in college but haven’t spoken to or seen since 2010.

DO: RSVP to the host personally – not just on-line
Also when Facebooking, unfortunately just clicking decline on an invitation isn’t enough. Get in contact with the host– either ring them or meet them in person beforehand and apologise that you cannot make the event. Tell them you are sorry that you can’t make it (this need not be true, but it’s polite) and you hope they have a good time (this one should be sincere!).

Finally from Forbe’s Rob Asghar – DON’T: Say, “I’m having a party. Bring your own food and drink.” That’s not a party.

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What Is Considered Good Social Etiquette in 2016?
September 12, 2016 (No Comments) by theSharpeUser

branded-a-doucheasaurus-post

People are the worst, right? The only thing worse than people is new people but there are some unavoidable situations that call for social interaction. While the times are always changing, there are some timeless rules on how to act around people, here we will look at a few things to consider if you are socially interacting in 2016.

DO: Let them know you will be late – on time
If you are due to meet someone at 1 o’clock, a text at 12.59 to say you won’t be there on time is not necessary – they have that much figured out. As soon as you know that you’ll be late, let your friend/ family member/ date “especially date!”, know what time exactly you will be there. With Facebook, WhatsApp, about a 100 free and openly available instant messaging apps as well as the good old-fashioned phone-call, there is no excuse not to keep whomever you are meeting in the loop as to when you will be joining them.

DON’T: Spend the whole day on the phone
Assuming you weren’t late, once you meet up with your friend have a conversation. You probably arranged to meet up on Facebook so now that your there, TALK to each other. Particularly in a larger group situation – don’t be the guy on the phone the whole time, talk to who is there (even if they are all horrible people, which may often be the case!) and do your best to enjoy the company you are in. Kanye West’s Twitter rant can wait until tomorrow.

DO: Limit the selfies
Come on now, we already mentioned putting the phone away! There should be a rule that limits Snapchats sent to three a day unless you are good at Snapchat (you’re not). A few pictures now and then is okay but don’t interrupt conversations just for a quick snap. There is also a good chance that in a house-party/ night club situation that at least one person in the picture won’t be looking their best – which brings us to…

DON’T: Put up bad pictures of people on Facebook
At this point we are all friends with our aunts on the social network and we don’t want them seeing us at our worst. If you have bad pictures of people when they are drunk by all means keep them and use them for future blackmail (although on second thought that should be filed under DON’T on this list). Either way, nobody needs pictures of them falling over in the club being shared on-line to be seen by that girl they kind of liked in college but haven’t spoken to or seen since 2010.

DO: RSVP to the host personally – not just on-line
Also when Facebooking, unfortunately just clicking decline on an invitation isn’t enough. Get in contact with the host– either ring them or meet them in person beforehand and apologise that you cannot make the event. Tell them you are sorry that you can’t make it (this need not be true, but it’s polite) and you hope they have a good time (this one should be sincere!).

Finally from Forbe’s Rob Asghar – DON’T: Say, “I’m having a party. Bring your own food and drink.” That’s not a party.

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