10 Reasons Why Irish Football Fans are Still the Best in the World
September 1, 2017 (No Comments) by Dean Fitzgerald

Irish fans of all sports are very highly regarded on the world stage. We’re seen as the life of the party at a Conor McGregor fight, the loudest singing crowd in any given stadium, and everyone wants to be seen with the Irish fans for one reason or another. From Chile to Japan, Irish sports fans are extremely popular (except maybe in North Korea, but that’s hardly our fault now!).

At any given time, Irish football fans are known for boisterous, good-natured support of their country. With crucial upcoming World Cup qualifier games against Georgia and Serbia on the Road to Russia 2018, we’ve come up with 10 reasons why the fans in green are STILL the best in the world.

1. Passion

Irish people are known for their staunch support and unrivalled ability to motivate their own, especially in terms of sporting occasions. It begins at the grassroots level in our very culture, being established in local clubs and filtering right through to an international stage.

Irish fans passion for those they support simply can’t be matched, and our presence is evident in the roars of support at a big game in the Aviva Stadium or Croke Park. Need convincing? Watch the national anthems in the 2007 Six Nations between Ireland and England at Croke Park. Goosebumps.

2. Our Songs

‘Fields of Anthenry’ and ‘Come on you Boys in Green’ are the mainstays of Irish sports chants, but the adoption of new lyrics for ‘Stand up for the Boys in Green’ won plaudits in France at Euro 2016. Instant classics like ‘Fix the car for the Boys in Green’, and a personal favourite, ‘Go home to your sexy wives’ directed at Swedish fans won hearts and minds all over, and painted Irish football fans as lovable rogues.

The creativity and verve with which we sing songs directly leads to our superiority over many other countries fans, particularly in the US, where abominations for chants are made. Even Northern Ireland got involved, etching Will Grigg into history without even playing a single game.

3. We Never Stop Singing

The German commentators were silenced by an Irish crowd at Euro 2012, singing defiantly in the face of a humiliating elimination from the tournament. How many countries have fans that sing win, lose or draw?

4. Having The Craic’

Relating to the earlier point about our chants, Irish football fans are known for letting loose and enjoying themselves at international games. Before and after games, Irish fans are at the epicentre of any and all fun that’s there to be had.

the-craic

Think Las Vegas, where Conor McGregor’s fights have cause floods of Irish people to ‘turn Vegas green’. Nobody has the craic like us, and we’re always enjoying ourselves without harming others, which leads to the next point…

5. We Don’t Cause Trouble

Euro 2016 saw a number of incidents of fighting between fans, mostly brought on by ultras from Russia who came with the sole intention of fighting. Football gangs are common across European clubs, including Ireland, but Irish fans are never the aggressors at international games.

We’re the good guys of international fans. We don’t cause hassle, and we’re more than willing to join in if there’s a bit of fun to be had. This could partially be due to the more friendly rivalry ideals of the GAA that keep us a little more grounded. Maybe it’s just in our nature.

6. We’re Incredibly Friendly

We in Ireland seemingly have a predilection towards being friendly when we go abroad. A warm welcome is far more common than simply saying ‘Howiya… we’re from Ireland!’, and our reputation for being sound precedes us.

Our displays of friendliness towards others were no more evident than last year in France, as video footage of Irish fans partying with Swedish fans, serenading a French woman, and even singing with the police went viral and made us all a bit prouder to hail from the Emerald Isle.

7. Suffering

Through Éamonn Dunphy and Liam Brady on RTÉ for Ireland games. Not much needs to be said here.

8. Appreciation of being at Major Tournaments

Ireland isn’t exactly a global football powerhouse, so when the opportunity to invite ourselves to a month long tournament arrives, we take it by both hands and hit the Credit Unions like a ton of bricks! This appreciation for being in major competitions gives Irish fans a genuine belief of ‘we may not be able to do this again for a while’, so enjoying ourselves is one of the main priorities at the tournaments.

Euro 2016 and 2012 and World Cups in 2002, 1994, and 1990 showcased how glad we were just to be there, even if we didn’t always get the result we wanted. We think the video above has captured the essence of exactly what we’re talking about!

9. Humility

The irony is clear here, but we are very humble as international sports fans in Ireland. We don’t often taste success, so as fans we have learned to enjoy the experience as a whole. Unlike England, we don’t have an over-inflated sense of our team’s ability, so expectations are kept well-grounded for the most part.

Germany, Spain, Argentina, Brazil and pedigree footballing nations like them come to tournaments expecting to win, there’s no enjoyment for them unless they do so. Irish fans, while obviously wishing for a team with a real possibility of winning, tend to operate under the phrase ‘Here for a good time, not a long time’, which is turning a potential negative into a positive.

10. Classy In Defeat, Classy In Victory

There’s one obvious exception to this: Thierry Henry’s handball. We all know what happened. The suggestion of a 33rd team in the World Cup didn’t sit well with Sepp Blatter (surprise surprise), but overall we really do take defeat very well, within reason. It reflects on the players also. A bad beating to Belgium was responded in kind with a monster performance against Italy. The fan reaction to the loss to France in the last 16 consisted mostly of ‘Best of luck in the Quarter Finals’.

We handle defeat like professionals, and when we do win, we celebrate with each other, not at the opposing fans on the other side of the stadium. Remember the delirium and pure joy at this iconic goal for Ireland fans? Who wouldn’t want to see more of that against the hardy Serbs next week at a packed out house in Dublin!

Not a single breath of rubbing it in for the German fans, just unbridled joy for a very special moment for our country’s national team.

Irish football fans are the very best the world has to offer. We enjoy ourselves, involve others in the fun, never deliberately cause problems for others, and we love being part of the whole experience. Here’s to more tournaments for the best in the world, starting hopefully with Russia 2018.

Pop on over to our Facebook page to get the lowdown on how you could win 2 tickets to the Serbia match and support the team next Tuesday, September 5th at the Aviva! Come on you Boys in Green!

Dean Fitzgerald
Can relate any life problems back to GAA. Has an interest in sport of all kinds, including even cricket for some reason.

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10 Reasons Why Irish Football Fans are Still the Best in the World
September 1, 2017 (No Comments) by Dean Fitzgerald

Irish fans of all sports are very highly regarded on the world stage. We’re seen as the life of the party at a Conor McGregor fight, the loudest singing crowd in any given stadium, and everyone wants to be seen with the Irish fans for one reason or another. From Chile to Japan, Irish sports fans are extremely popular (except maybe in North Korea, but that’s hardly our fault now!).

At any given time, Irish football fans are known for boisterous, good-natured support of their country. With crucial upcoming World Cup qualifier games against Georgia and Serbia on the Road to Russia 2018, we’ve come up with 10 reasons why the fans in green are STILL the best in the world.

1. Passion

Irish people are known for their staunch support and unrivalled ability to motivate their own, especially in terms of sporting occasions. It begins at the grassroots level in our very culture, being established in local clubs and filtering right through to an international stage.

Irish fans passion for those they support simply can’t be matched, and our presence is evident in the roars of support at a big game in the Aviva Stadium or Croke Park. Need convincing? Watch the national anthems in the 2007 Six Nations between Ireland and England at Croke Park. Goosebumps.

2. Our Songs

‘Fields of Anthenry’ and ‘Come on you Boys in Green’ are the mainstays of Irish sports chants, but the adoption of new lyrics for ‘Stand up for the Boys in Green’ won plaudits in France at Euro 2016. Instant classics like ‘Fix the car for the Boys in Green’, and a personal favourite, ‘Go home to your sexy wives’ directed at Swedish fans won hearts and minds all over, and painted Irish football fans as lovable rogues.

The creativity and verve with which we sing songs directly leads to our superiority over many other countries fans, particularly in the US, where abominations for chants are made. Even Northern Ireland got involved, etching Will Grigg into history without even playing a single game.

3. We Never Stop Singing

The German commentators were silenced by an Irish crowd at Euro 2012, singing defiantly in the face of a humiliating elimination from the tournament. How many countries have fans that sing win, lose or draw?

4. Having The Craic’

Relating to the earlier point about our chants, Irish football fans are known for letting loose and enjoying themselves at international games. Before and after games, Irish fans are at the epicentre of any and all fun that’s there to be had.

the-craic

Think Las Vegas, where Conor McGregor’s fights have cause floods of Irish people to ‘turn Vegas green’. Nobody has the craic like us, and we’re always enjoying ourselves without harming others, which leads to the next point…

5. We Don’t Cause Trouble

Euro 2016 saw a number of incidents of fighting between fans, mostly brought on by ultras from Russia who came with the sole intention of fighting. Football gangs are common across European clubs, including Ireland, but Irish fans are never the aggressors at international games.

We’re the good guys of international fans. We don’t cause hassle, and we’re more than willing to join in if there’s a bit of fun to be had. This could partially be due to the more friendly rivalry ideals of the GAA that keep us a little more grounded. Maybe it’s just in our nature.

6. We’re Incredibly Friendly

We in Ireland seemingly have a predilection towards being friendly when we go abroad. A warm welcome is far more common than simply saying ‘Howiya… we’re from Ireland!’, and our reputation for being sound precedes us.

Our displays of friendliness towards others were no more evident than last year in France, as video footage of Irish fans partying with Swedish fans, serenading a French woman, and even singing with the police went viral and made us all a bit prouder to hail from the Emerald Isle.

7. Suffering

Through Éamonn Dunphy and Liam Brady on RTÉ for Ireland games. Not much needs to be said here.

8. Appreciation of being at Major Tournaments

Ireland isn’t exactly a global football powerhouse, so when the opportunity to invite ourselves to a month long tournament arrives, we take it by both hands and hit the Credit Unions like a ton of bricks! This appreciation for being in major competitions gives Irish fans a genuine belief of ‘we may not be able to do this again for a while’, so enjoying ourselves is one of the main priorities at the tournaments.

Euro 2016 and 2012 and World Cups in 2002, 1994, and 1990 showcased how glad we were just to be there, even if we didn’t always get the result we wanted. We think the video above has captured the essence of exactly what we’re talking about!

9. Humility

The irony is clear here, but we are very humble as international sports fans in Ireland. We don’t often taste success, so as fans we have learned to enjoy the experience as a whole. Unlike England, we don’t have an over-inflated sense of our team’s ability, so expectations are kept well-grounded for the most part.

Germany, Spain, Argentina, Brazil and pedigree footballing nations like them come to tournaments expecting to win, there’s no enjoyment for them unless they do so. Irish fans, while obviously wishing for a team with a real possibility of winning, tend to operate under the phrase ‘Here for a good time, not a long time’, which is turning a potential negative into a positive.

10. Classy In Defeat, Classy In Victory

There’s one obvious exception to this: Thierry Henry’s handball. We all know what happened. The suggestion of a 33rd team in the World Cup didn’t sit well with Sepp Blatter (surprise surprise), but overall we really do take defeat very well, within reason. It reflects on the players also. A bad beating to Belgium was responded in kind with a monster performance against Italy. The fan reaction to the loss to France in the last 16 consisted mostly of ‘Best of luck in the Quarter Finals’.

We handle defeat like professionals, and when we do win, we celebrate with each other, not at the opposing fans on the other side of the stadium. Remember the delirium and pure joy at this iconic goal for Ireland fans? Who wouldn’t want to see more of that against the hardy Serbs next week at a packed out house in Dublin!

Not a single breath of rubbing it in for the German fans, just unbridled joy for a very special moment for our country’s national team.

Irish football fans are the very best the world has to offer. We enjoy ourselves, involve others in the fun, never deliberately cause problems for others, and we love being part of the whole experience. Here’s to more tournaments for the best in the world, starting hopefully with Russia 2018.

Pop on over to our Facebook page to get the lowdown on how you could win 2 tickets to the Serbia match and support the team next Tuesday, September 5th at the Aviva! Come on you Boys in Green!

Dean Fitzgerald
Can relate any life problems back to GAA. Has an interest in sport of all kinds, including even cricket for some reason.

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