What Does it Mean to Play Attractive Football?
September 22, 2017 (No Comments) by Phil Bourke

I’m a Liverpool fan, and as a Liverpool fan I want them to play attractive football and I want them to win games. However, I’m not the stereotypical fan that thinks this will be our year, that Klopp can do no wrong and, because of our history, we deserve something today.

Jurgen Klopp

Re-read that last paragraph, does anything stand out as odd to you? “I want Liverpool to play attractive football and I want them to win games”, contains two oddities in my mind. Firstly, what is “attractive football”? Surely, winning football matches is attractive.

Attractive Football – Pick Your Favourite

The ball on the ground, starting with the keeper, moving through midfield, and finally ending with an attempt on the opposition’s goal. Intricate passing, clever movement, and a well-oiled machine. The more passes the better so the boys in the studio can use the “pass counter” and put the play into fast forward. Here’s Barcelona with a lesson or two at the peak of their powers.

Give the opposition the ball, organise your team so they cannot breach your midfield or defence and your keeper becomes a conductor rather than a shot stopper. Eventually your foes will grow weary of repeated repulsion, tired of constantly having to find space and become increasingly desperate. Your heroes pick up possession in the opposition half and go for the jugular. Your attempt on goal is not long coming. The boys in the studio love it and throw imaginary squares over groups of players who are too close or too far apart, depending on their argument.

What If?

What if your keeper grabbed the ball from an opposition corner and held onto possession. Your defence and midfield pushed up field, forcing the opposition to retreat. The keeper now has nobody around him, he rolls the ball out to the edge of his box and looks for a target. He sends a long ball (such dirty words) towards his 6ft 3 striker. When the ball leaves the keeper’s foot two things happen, the tall striker prepares to deal with the dropping ball and his little strike partner springs into action knowing he is about to receive possession and a shot on goal.

The boys in the studio marvel at the on-field communication, the physical striker and his intuitive relationship with his diminutive partner. All the while bemoaning the defence’s feeble attempts to deal with the inevitable.

https://cdn.footballfancast.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Sunderland-Kevin-Phillips-and-Niall-Quinn.jpg

I love all three options, Spain in their pomp, Leicester at the height of their powers and Niall Quinn and Kevin Phillips. The one thing all those teams did was play to their strengths. Put simply, don’t ask Mignolet, Lovren, Matip, Klavan… to move the ball out from the back. They consistently pick passes that are either too difficult or too easy for them. The difficult ones end up in the stands and the easy ones do not progress play.

Defense > Offense

Liverpool’s weakest players reside closest to their own goal, it doesn’t make any sense to increase the amount of time they are in possession of the ball. Bypass the defence and get the ball into the opposition half until such time as Liverpool sign players that can use the ball. This will no doubt give them more time to think about what they are in the team to do… defend!

Image result for matip

Strip everything away and all I want to see is Liverpool win games. The more games they win the more trophies they will amass. This sustained success will attract better players and, guess what? We’ll have players who are as comfortable playing out from the back as they are preventing opposition attacks.

The Hard Facts

In the last 8 seasons, Liverpool have finished 6th or worse on 6 occasions. If there are at least five teams ahead of us competing for players, every summer and January, then we need to accept where we are and work with what we have. Walk before you run, one might say, alone if necessary.

Phil Bourke
Grumpy Liverpool fan, gazing wistfully into the past when things were exactly as they are now! Lover of football and Rugby League, proper sports!

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What Does it Mean to Play Attractive Football?
September 22, 2017 (No Comments) by Phil Bourke

I’m a Liverpool fan, and as a Liverpool fan I want them to play attractive football and I want them to win games. However, I’m not the stereotypical fan that thinks this will be our year, that Klopp can do no wrong and, because of our history, we deserve something today.

Jurgen Klopp

Re-read that last paragraph, does anything stand out as odd to you? “I want Liverpool to play attractive football and I want them to win games”, contains two oddities in my mind. Firstly, what is “attractive football”? Surely, winning football matches is attractive.

Attractive Football – Pick Your Favourite

The ball on the ground, starting with the keeper, moving through midfield, and finally ending with an attempt on the opposition’s goal. Intricate passing, clever movement, and a well-oiled machine. The more passes the better so the boys in the studio can use the “pass counter” and put the play into fast forward. Here’s Barcelona with a lesson or two at the peak of their powers.

Give the opposition the ball, organise your team so they cannot breach your midfield or defence and your keeper becomes a conductor rather than a shot stopper. Eventually your foes will grow weary of repeated repulsion, tired of constantly having to find space and become increasingly desperate. Your heroes pick up possession in the opposition half and go for the jugular. Your attempt on goal is not long coming. The boys in the studio love it and throw imaginary squares over groups of players who are too close or too far apart, depending on their argument.

What If?

What if your keeper grabbed the ball from an opposition corner and held onto possession. Your defence and midfield pushed up field, forcing the opposition to retreat. The keeper now has nobody around him, he rolls the ball out to the edge of his box and looks for a target. He sends a long ball (such dirty words) towards his 6ft 3 striker. When the ball leaves the keeper’s foot two things happen, the tall striker prepares to deal with the dropping ball and his little strike partner springs into action knowing he is about to receive possession and a shot on goal.

The boys in the studio marvel at the on-field communication, the physical striker and his intuitive relationship with his diminutive partner. All the while bemoaning the defence’s feeble attempts to deal with the inevitable.

https://cdn.footballfancast.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Sunderland-Kevin-Phillips-and-Niall-Quinn.jpg

I love all three options, Spain in their pomp, Leicester at the height of their powers and Niall Quinn and Kevin Phillips. The one thing all those teams did was play to their strengths. Put simply, don’t ask Mignolet, Lovren, Matip, Klavan… to move the ball out from the back. They consistently pick passes that are either too difficult or too easy for them. The difficult ones end up in the stands and the easy ones do not progress play.

Defense > Offense

Liverpool’s weakest players reside closest to their own goal, it doesn’t make any sense to increase the amount of time they are in possession of the ball. Bypass the defence and get the ball into the opposition half until such time as Liverpool sign players that can use the ball. This will no doubt give them more time to think about what they are in the team to do… defend!

Image result for matip

Strip everything away and all I want to see is Liverpool win games. The more games they win the more trophies they will amass. This sustained success will attract better players and, guess what? We’ll have players who are as comfortable playing out from the back as they are preventing opposition attacks.

The Hard Facts

In the last 8 seasons, Liverpool have finished 6th or worse on 6 occasions. If there are at least five teams ahead of us competing for players, every summer and January, then we need to accept where we are and work with what we have. Walk before you run, one might say, alone if necessary.

Phil Bourke
Grumpy Liverpool fan, gazing wistfully into the past when things were exactly as they are now! Lover of football and Rugby League, proper sports!

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Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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