The Bluffer’s Guide To Rugby Terms
March 9, 2017 (No Comments) by Ryan Corry

It’s that time of year again, when Six Nations fever grips the nation, or at least it did for 80 minutes until the Scottish put a very premature end to Ireland’s Grand Slam hopes on the opening weekend. BUT, all is on the up and up again and the rugger fans are back out in force as things are going relatively well. We made our predictions early for the 2017 Six Nations and Ireland’s Chances, as it stands the bookies are being made look very savvy with England producing the most dominant displays to date.

2017-six-nations

As you all know, if you’ve ever been in a pub on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon between February and April, the Irish rugby team develop quite a following for this brief spell every year. Some of them will gladly admit that they’re only in it for the excuse to start drinking earlier on a Saturday afternoon but others, the stubborn few, will try and convince you that they are experts on all things rugby.

Here’s a few words that those select few will be throwing around the bar, the toilets and the taxi home just to convince as many people as possible that they know their stuff.

The Breakdown

The period of play between a tackle being made and before and during the period when the ruck is formed. During this time the teams compete to either retain or turnover possession.

Turnover

When a team loses possession of the ball in a ruck or maul.

Blindside

The narrow side of the pitch in relation to where the ball is in the scrum or breakdown in play. Also used to describe positions i.e. blindside flanker.

Line Speed

The rate at which the defending team attacks the team in position. A blitz technique used to make it difficult to cross the gain line.

Gain Line

Imaginary line across the pitch from where the ruck or breakdown has taken place.

Grubber Kick

A kick along the ground causing the egg shaped ball to bounce in an irregular fashion making it hard for the defending team to recover.

Garryowen

A high, short kick designed to give the kicking team a chance to recover. Not to be confused with the club in Limerick. Also known as the up and under.

Box Kick

An over the shoulder kick taken, usually by the scrum half, from directly behind the scrum/ruck on the blindside of the field.

the-bluffers-guide-to-rugby-terms

Hopefully, if you are heading down the local for a few pints to watch some of the rugby this weekend, you can try and separate the bluffers from the hardcore fans. These are just some of the phrases that you will hear from the commentary and chatter around you. If you fancy going the extra mile, you can pick up a copy of Steven Gauge’s paper back on The Bluffer’s Guide to Rugby from Amazon for just £6.99.

Disclaimer: Try not to get yourself in too deep because the above terms do not cover the full Rugby Union dictionary. You may find yourself talking about far more complex issues within the game and reveal your true bluffer status.

Ryan Corry
Jack of all trades, master of none. Optimistic Sunday league footballer and occasional PRO. Claim To Fame – I once played Minor at the age of 20.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Find us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

Recent Posts

The Bluffer’s Guide To Rugby Terms
March 9, 2017 (No Comments) by Ryan Corry

It’s that time of year again, when Six Nations fever grips the nation, or at least it did for 80 minutes until the Scottish put a very premature end to Ireland’s Grand Slam hopes on the opening weekend. BUT, all is on the up and up again and the rugger fans are back out in force as things are going relatively well. We made our predictions early for the 2017 Six Nations and Ireland’s Chances, as it stands the bookies are being made look very savvy with England producing the most dominant displays to date.

2017-six-nations

As you all know, if you’ve ever been in a pub on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon between February and April, the Irish rugby team develop quite a following for this brief spell every year. Some of them will gladly admit that they’re only in it for the excuse to start drinking earlier on a Saturday afternoon but others, the stubborn few, will try and convince you that they are experts on all things rugby.

Here’s a few words that those select few will be throwing around the bar, the toilets and the taxi home just to convince as many people as possible that they know their stuff.

The Breakdown

The period of play between a tackle being made and before and during the period when the ruck is formed. During this time the teams compete to either retain or turnover possession.

Turnover

When a team loses possession of the ball in a ruck or maul.

Blindside

The narrow side of the pitch in relation to where the ball is in the scrum or breakdown in play. Also used to describe positions i.e. blindside flanker.

Line Speed

The rate at which the defending team attacks the team in position. A blitz technique used to make it difficult to cross the gain line.

Gain Line

Imaginary line across the pitch from where the ruck or breakdown has taken place.

Grubber Kick

A kick along the ground causing the egg shaped ball to bounce in an irregular fashion making it hard for the defending team to recover.

Garryowen

A high, short kick designed to give the kicking team a chance to recover. Not to be confused with the club in Limerick. Also known as the up and under.

Box Kick

An over the shoulder kick taken, usually by the scrum half, from directly behind the scrum/ruck on the blindside of the field.

the-bluffers-guide-to-rugby-terms

Hopefully, if you are heading down the local for a few pints to watch some of the rugby this weekend, you can try and separate the bluffers from the hardcore fans. These are just some of the phrases that you will hear from the commentary and chatter around you. If you fancy going the extra mile, you can pick up a copy of Steven Gauge’s paper back on The Bluffer’s Guide to Rugby from Amazon for just £6.99.

Disclaimer: Try not to get yourself in too deep because the above terms do not cover the full Rugby Union dictionary. You may find yourself talking about far more complex issues within the game and reveal your true bluffer status.

Ryan Corry
Jack of all trades, master of none. Optimistic Sunday league footballer and occasional PRO. Claim To Fame – I once played Minor at the age of 20.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Find us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

Recent Posts