Has the Dublin Tech Summit Filled the Gap?
March 1, 2017 (No Comments) by Dean Fitzgerald

has-the-dublin-tech-summit-filled-the-gap

Two weeks ago an estimated 10,000 people attended the Dublin Tech Summit in the Convention Centre in Dublin city, a new conference that was put in place after it was found that the mega successful Web Summit was moving to Lisbon last year.

Although attendance numbers were slightly below expectations, there was a sense of satisfaction that the Summit had attempted to tackle a question that constantly sits on the minds of those invested in technology: What is the future of the tech industry in Ireland?

Businesses and Speakers

Some heavyweight companies were involved in the Summit as partners as well, which only served to further enhance the event’s reputation in its first year. The largest of these companies included Accenture, Samsung, Aer Lingus, Eir, and Intel. It was also supported by Fáilte Ireland, IDA Ireland, Enterprise Ireland and the Dublin City Council, showcasing the importance of a summit of this kind to Ireland and Dublin.

Speakers at the event included Pixar Story Veteran Matthew Luhn, Paypal VP of Global Operations Louise Phelan, Jimmy Chamberlain, Blue J Strategies CEO and drummer for The Smashing Pumpkins, advertising consultant and founder of IfWeRanTheWorld and MakeLoveNotPorn, Cindy Gallop, and tech guru Gary Vaynerchuk (pictured below) who is the CEO of Vayner Media.

gary-vee-dublin-tech-summit

Who Was The Summit Aimed At?

With ticket prices believed to have averaged around €400, the Summit seemed aimed more towards businesses and entrepreneurial people looking to gain new connections for future ventures, especially given that 100 start-up businesses were exhibiting their products and services.

Indeed, the summit had very few aspects that were present to intrigue and entice the average tech head off the street, staying away for the most part from the technologies typically used by the everyday person – mobile phones, tablets, laptops, and gaming consoles. The Samsung Gear VR display and Robothespian, a life-sized humanoid robot that was designed to interact with humans, were a nice touch for anyone feeling apprehensive of the complexity of these technologies, however.

robothespian-dublin-tech-summit

Was the Summit a Success?

Seeing the Dublin Tech Summit being in its first year, the presence of large companies, several start-ups, and the support of Irish business groups is very promising for the future of the Summit. Despite a slightly lower than expected number of attendees, its reputation will only improve as it goes on and drums up more interest.

Even as a new event, there was a positive response to the summit as a whole and this will only help it grow in the future. Naturally it had its teething pains, some of the speakers received mixed reviews, but that was to be expected. The organisers of the Dublin Tech Summit will have their eyes set on replicating the success of the Web Summit in the not so distant future.

Another quality aspect of the Summit is the development of a YouTube channel to try and broadcast the best elements it had to offer. By having videos of some of its more popular items, the Tech Summit will surely build a stronger presence with tech minds and the media alike. Get a feel of all the goings on at the event from the overview video below or check out the Dublin Tech Summit YouTube channel if you’re feeling really intrigued.

Has it Filled the Gap?

Considering the Dublin Web Summit had 42,000 visitors in its final year, and the Tech Summit is only in its first year, it has clearly not fully filled a very considerable gap. It’s hard to really compare the two summits, especially given the two different directions they’ve gone in.

However, from the 10,000 strong crowd to the massive interest from businesses, both start-ups and established, it has to be said that the Dublin Tech Summit is working hard to fill a void in the Irish tech calendar which was left behind by the Web Summit. To hear more about how the event in Lisbon was received last November, check out our article on Web Summit 2016 – Bigger or Better?

So in conclusion, the idea is great, the interest is there, and if the event is run properly with an ambition to match, it’s possible that the Dublin Tech Summit can be the catalyst that will cause more international tech minds to flock to our shores every year.

Dean Fitzgerald
Can relate any life problems back to GAA. Has an interest in sport of all kinds, including even cricket for some reason.

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Has the Dublin Tech Summit Filled the Gap?
March 1, 2017 (No Comments) by Dean Fitzgerald

has-the-dublin-tech-summit-filled-the-gap

Two weeks ago an estimated 10,000 people attended the Dublin Tech Summit in the Convention Centre in Dublin city, a new conference that was put in place after it was found that the mega successful Web Summit was moving to Lisbon last year.

Although attendance numbers were slightly below expectations, there was a sense of satisfaction that the Summit had attempted to tackle a question that constantly sits on the minds of those invested in technology: What is the future of the tech industry in Ireland?

Businesses and Speakers

Some heavyweight companies were involved in the Summit as partners as well, which only served to further enhance the event’s reputation in its first year. The largest of these companies included Accenture, Samsung, Aer Lingus, Eir, and Intel. It was also supported by Fáilte Ireland, IDA Ireland, Enterprise Ireland and the Dublin City Council, showcasing the importance of a summit of this kind to Ireland and Dublin.

Speakers at the event included Pixar Story Veteran Matthew Luhn, Paypal VP of Global Operations Louise Phelan, Jimmy Chamberlain, Blue J Strategies CEO and drummer for The Smashing Pumpkins, advertising consultant and founder of IfWeRanTheWorld and MakeLoveNotPorn, Cindy Gallop, and tech guru Gary Vaynerchuk (pictured below) who is the CEO of Vayner Media.

gary-vee-dublin-tech-summit

Who Was The Summit Aimed At?

With ticket prices believed to have averaged around €400, the Summit seemed aimed more towards businesses and entrepreneurial people looking to gain new connections for future ventures, especially given that 100 start-up businesses were exhibiting their products and services.

Indeed, the summit had very few aspects that were present to intrigue and entice the average tech head off the street, staying away for the most part from the technologies typically used by the everyday person – mobile phones, tablets, laptops, and gaming consoles. The Samsung Gear VR display and Robothespian, a life-sized humanoid robot that was designed to interact with humans, were a nice touch for anyone feeling apprehensive of the complexity of these technologies, however.

robothespian-dublin-tech-summit

Was the Summit a Success?

Seeing the Dublin Tech Summit being in its first year, the presence of large companies, several start-ups, and the support of Irish business groups is very promising for the future of the Summit. Despite a slightly lower than expected number of attendees, its reputation will only improve as it goes on and drums up more interest.

Even as a new event, there was a positive response to the summit as a whole and this will only help it grow in the future. Naturally it had its teething pains, some of the speakers received mixed reviews, but that was to be expected. The organisers of the Dublin Tech Summit will have their eyes set on replicating the success of the Web Summit in the not so distant future.

Another quality aspect of the Summit is the development of a YouTube channel to try and broadcast the best elements it had to offer. By having videos of some of its more popular items, the Tech Summit will surely build a stronger presence with tech minds and the media alike. Get a feel of all the goings on at the event from the overview video below or check out the Dublin Tech Summit YouTube channel if you’re feeling really intrigued.

Has it Filled the Gap?

Considering the Dublin Web Summit had 42,000 visitors in its final year, and the Tech Summit is only in its first year, it has clearly not fully filled a very considerable gap. It’s hard to really compare the two summits, especially given the two different directions they’ve gone in.

However, from the 10,000 strong crowd to the massive interest from businesses, both start-ups and established, it has to be said that the Dublin Tech Summit is working hard to fill a void in the Irish tech calendar which was left behind by the Web Summit. To hear more about how the event in Lisbon was received last November, check out our article on Web Summit 2016 – Bigger or Better?

So in conclusion, the idea is great, the interest is there, and if the event is run properly with an ambition to match, it’s possible that the Dublin Tech Summit can be the catalyst that will cause more international tech minds to flock to our shores every year.

Dean Fitzgerald
Can relate any life problems back to GAA. Has an interest in sport of all kinds, including even cricket for some reason.

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