What’s Your Pleasure? Galway Opens Pioneering Record, Coffee & Club Spot
June 24, 2019 (No Comments) by theSharpeUser

A change of pace and style on Abbeygate Street in Galway city with the opening of Pleasure. It’s a time of change, for clubs, for retail and the vinyl industry — as competition with cafes, pubs, online and festivals is tougher than it ever has been.

There is now a need for a new kind of space… like Pleasure. After a decade making clubs and nightlife spaces in Galway, and seeing the ways in which people experience music and club culture change, John Gillen wanted to do something to make sense of the old and the new.

The installation type space — based off mobile soundsystems and incorporating elements of cafe, bar, record store & rave culture — could just as easily occupy a retail street; a festival site; or a warehouse party.

Open six days a week (closed on Monday) with specialty coffee on brew from London’s Squaremile and a ‘mini bar’ of craft beers and ‘lushies’ (spiked slushies); and with live shows, in-store parties, late night record shopping and even DJ workshops on the weekends, Pleasure is the intimate space to grab a coffee and pick up a record for your vinyl collection, while fresh local DJs and international surprise guests soundtrack your experience.

Pleasure is not just about the music either, but everything that makes a good club experience and culture: the people, space, politics, style, art and visual culture.

“A good club draws a circle around a specific bunch of people; their music taste, style, culture and beliefs. We wanted to make a space for like-minded people in Galway and Ireland in general. A space for what we care about, a way to enjoy and experience the pleasures of the club in a daytime setting,” explained John.

Pleasure will shine a spotlight Galway’s most well-respected and up and coming faces — like Shampain, Padraic Disconaut, John Daly and Enda House — some of whom will be teaching people the basics of DJing digitally and on vinyl, with weekend workshops kicking off in July.

That’s not to forget the essential party setting, but to highlight and bolster it. Clubs are disappearing and the culture is being lost.

“It’s not just a nostalgic nod to a forgotten artform, but a grassroots cultivation of real interest — through records and label culture, in-store events, artwork, books, workshops and exhibitions. A space for people to access, experience and appreciate it outside of a night out.”

Social media hype and outrage are right around every corner to bolster any movement or campaign, making it easy to dramatize, romanticise and place anything from the past in a nostalgic light, without really generating a whole lot of a real life outcome. One thing is for sure right now, and that is that Irish nightlife and clubbing is in a state of flux, more so than it ever has been since any of us have been on the planet.

On the one hand, we have the positive momentum of Give Us The Night, the rising popularity of electronic music within the country and a generation of young people capable of stirring change left, right and centre. On the other, we’ve got what feels like a never-ending string archaic government parties, clubs closing in our capital and beyond and closing times that leave businesses with barely 3 hours to operate within.

Statuses, stories, retweets and whatever other online initiatives can only go so far. So we decided it was time for a real-life action in order to give clubland a daytime backbone while its future is cloudier than ever. Music is for everyone and anytime, not just when it’s dark, meaning we’re here for the people that want to hear the words just as much as we are for those that live for the drums. As diverse and forward thinking as our young generation might be, they need day AND night hubs to inhabit, not just to be pigeonholed as people of the night that all worship repetitive beats.

That means morning time coffees for the early risers of Abbeygate Street, beers and pre parties for those looking to get their nighttimes underway a little earlier, and a soundtrack of music that fits any time of your day. Pleasure isn’t for one type of person or the other, nor is it a swansong to historicise the clubbing industry, it’s here to give a real-time and real-life home to the people that’re just as passionate about all types of music and pleasures as we are.

If you’re travelling around the country and want to stay connected with the record store community, be sure to check out these Unique Irish Record Stores That Are Making a Difference.

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What’s Your Pleasure? Galway Opens Pioneering Record, Coffee & Club Spot
June 24, 2019 (No Comments) by theSharpeUser

A change of pace and style on Abbeygate Street in Galway city with the opening of Pleasure. It’s a time of change, for clubs, for retail and the vinyl industry — as competition with cafes, pubs, online and festivals is tougher than it ever has been.

There is now a need for a new kind of space… like Pleasure. After a decade making clubs and nightlife spaces in Galway, and seeing the ways in which people experience music and club culture change, John Gillen wanted to do something to make sense of the old and the new.

The installation type space — based off mobile soundsystems and incorporating elements of cafe, bar, record store & rave culture — could just as easily occupy a retail street; a festival site; or a warehouse party.

Open six days a week (closed on Monday) with specialty coffee on brew from London’s Squaremile and a ‘mini bar’ of craft beers and ‘lushies’ (spiked slushies); and with live shows, in-store parties, late night record shopping and even DJ workshops on the weekends, Pleasure is the intimate space to grab a coffee and pick up a record for your vinyl collection, while fresh local DJs and international surprise guests soundtrack your experience.

Pleasure is not just about the music either, but everything that makes a good club experience and culture: the people, space, politics, style, art and visual culture.

“A good club draws a circle around a specific bunch of people; their music taste, style, culture and beliefs. We wanted to make a space for like-minded people in Galway and Ireland in general. A space for what we care about, a way to enjoy and experience the pleasures of the club in a daytime setting,” explained John.

Pleasure will shine a spotlight Galway’s most well-respected and up and coming faces — like Shampain, Padraic Disconaut, John Daly and Enda House — some of whom will be teaching people the basics of DJing digitally and on vinyl, with weekend workshops kicking off in July.

That’s not to forget the essential party setting, but to highlight and bolster it. Clubs are disappearing and the culture is being lost.

“It’s not just a nostalgic nod to a forgotten artform, but a grassroots cultivation of real interest — through records and label culture, in-store events, artwork, books, workshops and exhibitions. A space for people to access, experience and appreciate it outside of a night out.”

Social media hype and outrage are right around every corner to bolster any movement or campaign, making it easy to dramatize, romanticise and place anything from the past in a nostalgic light, without really generating a whole lot of a real life outcome. One thing is for sure right now, and that is that Irish nightlife and clubbing is in a state of flux, more so than it ever has been since any of us have been on the planet.

On the one hand, we have the positive momentum of Give Us The Night, the rising popularity of electronic music within the country and a generation of young people capable of stirring change left, right and centre. On the other, we’ve got what feels like a never-ending string archaic government parties, clubs closing in our capital and beyond and closing times that leave businesses with barely 3 hours to operate within.

Statuses, stories, retweets and whatever other online initiatives can only go so far. So we decided it was time for a real-life action in order to give clubland a daytime backbone while its future is cloudier than ever. Music is for everyone and anytime, not just when it’s dark, meaning we’re here for the people that want to hear the words just as much as we are for those that live for the drums. As diverse and forward thinking as our young generation might be, they need day AND night hubs to inhabit, not just to be pigeonholed as people of the night that all worship repetitive beats.

That means morning time coffees for the early risers of Abbeygate Street, beers and pre parties for those looking to get their nighttimes underway a little earlier, and a soundtrack of music that fits any time of your day. Pleasure isn’t for one type of person or the other, nor is it a swansong to historicise the clubbing industry, it’s here to give a real-time and real-life home to the people that’re just as passionate about all types of music and pleasures as we are.

If you’re travelling around the country and want to stay connected with the record store community, be sure to check out these Unique Irish Record Stores That Are Making a Difference.



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